marketing strategy

How is Curiosity related to Creativity? What are the barriers to your curiosity? Find out how to spur the curiosity of yourself and your team.

Experimenters. You know the type.

As children, we call them “precocious”. They’re the ones who are always asking, “Why? Why? WHY?”

In middle school, they were sometimes called “mischievous,” seeming unable to resist finding out what would happen if…

In high school, they were called “nerds” because they seemed to obsess about the most unusual things.

As adults, they brew beer, collect anvils, travel, rebuild car engines, watch birds, and join fantasy sports leagues. They seek to understand the rules of some endeavor, and then figure out what happens if they break those rules.

Yes, this is pretty much everyone. In some area of our lives, we all find ourselves obsessing about how things work, why they work that way, and what we could do to make things better.

Unfortunately, the area of our lives that we spend the most time on isn’t the one we are most curious about: our work. How many experimenters do you work with — the kind of people that make you ask, “When did you have time to do that?”

If your answer wasn’t “I am that person,” I have to ask the question, “Why?” What has dampened your curiosity?

It turns out there are four factors that limit our curiosity. My guest, Dr. Diane Hamilton documents them in her book, “The Curiosity Code.” She evaluated me, and I was surprised at what I learned about the limits of MY curiosity.

The Relationship Between Curiosity and Creativity with Dr Diane Hamilton

The Relationship Between Curiosity and Creativity with Dr Diane Hamilton

Curiosity with Dr. Diane Hamilton

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Dr. Diane Hamilton is an expert in emotional intelligence and behavioral science. She is an author, radio host of “Take the Lead Radio,” and creator of the Curiosity Code Index – which we will dive into on today’s episode.

Curiosity is a topic that is at the core of everything marketers do. We’re all about experimenting, discovering data, and getting answers when it comes to website redesigns, launches, and campaigns.

More importantly, I think that curiosity is a doorway into the mystical peak experiences called “Flow.”.

So anything that limits my curiosity is something that needs to be addressed. Let’s find out what the four limiting factors are and how I scored on her evaluation.

We all start off curious.

When you get back to the office…

When do you feel it’s OK to put your work down and play? Or learn something new?

For me it’s often on Friday afternoons, when the deadlines are met, and things are winding down. I’ve gotten purposeful about tapping these natural times when the bonds of my mind relax, allowing me to follow my curiosity.

The other time for me is when I’m on a deadline. I allow myself to renegotiate a deadline if I’m learning something that will improve my performance long term.

When do you find yourself following rabbits down holes?

Do you feel guilty?

Does your team support it? Do they even know about it? Why not?

How could you configure your work world to indulge these moments of exploration?

I recommend you take Dr. Hamilton’s Curiosity Code Index and see what’s in your way.

An example of Brian Massey's Curiosity Code Index

An example of Brian Massey’s Curiosity Code Index

Resources and links from the Podcast

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How often do your landing pages break promises made in your ads or newsletters? Here’s an example that may hit home.

This is a tale of two companies who can’t afford to blacken their reputation any more than they already have.

It is the story of one letter, one landing page and a broken promise.

Experian doesn’t have many friends in the public domain. Their main job is to prevent people from getting homes, cars and frozen pizzas. Their second job is to make it hard for victims of identity theft to redeem themselves.

Adobe is a company who gave 2.9 million of their customers’ account information to thieves.

I love my Adobe software, so I was philosophical about the security breach. I got a nice letter saying that they’d hired Experian to make sure I didn’t fall victim to identity fraud.

The letter gave no hint of irony.

“You have until February 28, 2014 to activate this complimentary credit monitoring membership by using the following activation code: XXXXXXXX. This code is unique for your use and may not be shared. To enroll, please visit http://www.protectmyid.com/adobe, or call …”

I visited the link in the letter. The letter made a clear promise and this link contains a promise by including the word “adobe” in it.

The link sent me here:

This landing page broke a promise made in a letter.

This landing page broke a promise made in a letter.

No blank for an activation code.

No mention of Adobe on the page.

A broken promise.

I took the time to try to sign up. They wouldn’t take my activation code.

The best brand experience is giving visitors what they expect. These companies are pissing on the people they have already let down.

How many times are your ads making promises that your landing pages are breaking?

When Landing Pages Break Promises UPDATE

The landing page has changed. Now THIS is a promise kept:

This landing page from Experian keeps the promise.

This landing page from Experian keeps the promise.

This is a landing page that keeps Adobe’s promise. My only criticism of this page is the use of stock photography, which we call business porn.

Related reading: What Keeps Visitors from Converting on your Site?

Now, where did I put that letter?


21 Quick and Easy CRO Copywriting Hacks to Skyrocket Conversions

21 Quick and Easy CRO Copywriting Hacks

Keep these proven copywriting hacks in mind to make your copy convert.

  • 43 Pages with Examples
  • Assumptive Phrasing
  • "We" vs. "You"
  • Pattern Interrupts
  • The Power of Three
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We explore how intelligent marketing technology stacks can help marketers manage their omni channel marketing strategy. Plus, the perils of walking the line between creativity and efficiency. And at the very end, the very own Brian Massey, gives a formula to start prioritizing our traffic-driving investments.

Digito Marketus:

This is a species of primate known generically as digital marketers. During the day, it’s natural habitat is tall square nests built for it, called offices. These are social animals that travel in groups called “departments.” They work alongside other species, such as Neandersales and Blockus ITeas.

This clever species forages through forests of audiences dining primarily on the fruit of the prospect tree, which they share with a symbiotic species, the Neandersales.

This species is known for working in places with scarce resources. They have evolved to flourish with very little. As such, they must be highly creative AND they must be efficient..

They are advanced enough to use tools that help them make fewer mistakes, giving them time for more creative pursuits.

If you’re listening to this podcast, you are either Digito Maketus or manage a department of them.

My guest today studies this species for a living. And — surprise — she actually is a member of the Digito Marketus.

Lindsay Tjepkema (Chep Ka MA), Director of Marketing for the Americas at Emarsys, is a marketer who markets to marketers.

Do you know "Digito Marketus" or are you one of them? Then listen to this podcast on how to walk the line between creativity and efficiency with marketing technology stacks for the omnichannel strategy.

Podcast: Digito Marketus is a species commonly known as “Digital Marketers”

Lindsay Tjepkema | Using Marketing Technology Stacks to Create Stacks of Cash

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Resources and links discussed:

On this episode of Intended Consequences, we come to understand how this fascinating species walks the line between creativity and efficiency, crayons and spreadsheets, design and databases.

We’ll talk about how she uses marketing technology stacks for the OmniChannel strategy to create stacks of cash.

We lure Digito Marketus out of its nest– using a trail pens, thumb drives and t-shirts emblazoned with corporate logos — and ask some important questions.

What is it that drives your creativity? What are the roots of your experience that lead you into this role? And how do you balance this creative desire with the need to be efficient and data-driven?

On every episode of this podcast, we give you one technique to challenge you as a marketer, manager or business owner. So, accept the challenge and take your business or practice to new heights. It’s at the very end of the podcast.

Intro to Marketing Technology Stacks for the OmniChannel Strategy

I think marketers really just need to know what what’s available to them and how how to use it so that they can be more successful.

During this podcast, I want to ask that you actively participate in this conversation. What I mean by that is – while I’m asking Lindsay questions, I want you to asking yourself those questions. For example, when it comes to marketing what does success mean for your organization?

And to dig even deeper, Lindsay and I go into this question of “why is it that marketers seem to struggle to get to that next to the next level of success? Are you struggling?

This conversation with Lindsay will start with me first asking how she measures success.

If you want to connect with Lindsay Tjepkema or Emarsys and Host of the Marketer + Machine podcast. You can check her out at emarsys dot com and her podcast.

We talked about knowing the value of a lead on this episode. If you sell stuff online, it’s easy to know how much a transaction is worth. But what if you generate leads or email list subscribers?

When you get back to the office (a formula to start prioritizing your traffic-driving investments)

When you get back to the office, try to put a dollar value on your leads or subscribers — even if you’re an eCommerce business, you must be using an email list.

THIS DOES NOT HAVE TO BE ACCURATE. What you want is a dollar value that you can use to prioritize what you’re investing in. It will require you to look in Analytics and possibly the customer relationship management system your sales team uses.

It’s basically, the revenue generated from your Website divided by the number of leads you generate.

It requires you to understand how many leads or subscribers you’re generating and then how much revenue you are getting from that.

Don’t let silos get in the way. When you don’t have real data, estimate.

At the end of the day, you’ll be able to say, “we generated 100 leads last month. That’s $2500 dollars in our pocket!

Alright scientists, that’s it for this week.

 

When you think of the machine that is your online business, what do you picture? Do you see something organic? Something mechanical?

I think it’s helpful to pick a vision. The marketing and sales functions are too complex. The tools and channels are changing faster today than at any time in history. Thanks, internet.

The advertising, marketing and sales process.

Vizualize your marketing machine to make good decisions about where to invest.

Visualizing the process helps us focus on the pieces one at a time, instead of being overwhelmed by the mass of moving parts that feed our pipes, funnels and drips. When we work with clients, we tend to talk about knobs.

Here’s what I mean.

Our Marketing Machine Looks Like A Scientific Instrument

The most powerful metric for an online marketing ecosystem is acquisition cost.

The lower your acquisition cost, the higher your profit.

The lower your acquisition cost, the cheaper all of your advertising becomes.

The lower your acquisition cost, the more places you can afford to advertise.

But acquisition cost isn’t a dial you set. It’s the product of several dials.

The Acquisition Cost Spectrophotometer

We control acquisition costs using a device called the “Acquisition Cost Spectrophotometer” (ACS). This powerful device has two dials.

1. Traffic cost

2. Conversions — Typically leads or online transactions

We plug the ACS into any incoming channel — search engines, email, referrals, social media and so on. Then we begin to play with the knobs.

If we increase the traffic costs, but the conversions stay the same, we increase our acquisition cost, and the little red warning light turns on. If we dial down the traffic costs and keep the conversions the same, acquisition costs go down, and the red warning light goes off.

So, if we can increase conversions without increasing traffic costs, we get all the benefits of a lower acquisition cost. And for the paid search channel, we can actually lower the traffic costs by raising the conversion rate because Google rewards ads with effective landing pages by placing them higher on the search results pages.

Mathematically, the acquisition cost is calculated as:

Total Traffic Cost/Conversions

OR

Total Traffic Cost * Conversion Rate

If we put our metaphor down for a moment, we know that each of these “knobs” actually involves an entire process. Our “Traffic Cost” knob is controlled by an advertising and media team focused on getting the highest quality clicks for the fewest dollars.

Our “Conversions” knob is a metaphor for a team of data scientists, developers, designers and test techs focused on delivering the right experience to entice action.

All the marketer needs to do is determine if they should be investing in traffic or conversions, then fund the teams accordingly.

Vectron Conversion Analyzer

These are the primary knobs you turn when optimizing for conversion.

These are the primary knobs you turn when optimizing for conversion.

The Vectron Conversion Analyzer doesn’t actually exist, but we can visualize ourselve adjusting the knobs as we optimize our site.

When focused on optimizing a website for a given traffic channel, there are a number of knobs we control. I visualize a “Vectron Conversion Analyzer” as a metaphor for our process.

This amazing device allows us to control a number of “ingredients” that can lead to more conversions for any given traffic source. If you read this column, you’ll be familiar with most of the knobs on this little gem.

Value Proposition

The headlines, text, and images that spell out the value being offered by your company and products. Answers the question, “What’s in it for me?”

Layout and User Experience

The way the design draws a visitor’s eye to the important parts of each page and the cues that move them step-by-step along their exploratory journey.

Should important information be moved above the fold? Is there a visual hierarchy that tells the visitor what is important?

Credibility And Authority

A site design’s first job is to make the site seem credible. It should communicate that the company and products represent an authority in the solution space that it occupies.

Trust And Security

The visual cues that tell a visitor that the site will treat any information exchanged with care and veracity.

Social Proof

What do others like me think about this company, site and products?

Splitting The Signal

The Vectron machine splits the traffic up, allowing us to test different settings at one time. This is how we determine two very important things:

1. What is lacking from the site that visitors expect.

2. By how much each change increases the site’s performance.

AB Testing gives you the feedback on your conversion optimization work.

AB Testing gives you the feedback on your conversion optimization work.

Visualizations That Help You Prioritize

We rarely have the budgets to invest in every part of our marketing machine. Having a metaphor by which you can visualize the pieces working together offers a powerful way to decide how to invest over time.

Using the visualization at the top of this page, you may not have any luck seeding your brand clouds with advertising until you’ve built brand awareness. When it rains, you should invest in the downspouts that drive leads into the soil of marketing.

If your sales close ratios aren’t flowering, you may need to look at the quality delivered by ads and conversion together. Once you have a low acquisition cost, you can again invest in more expensive advertising channels to seed your brand’s rain clouds and bring the rain.