speaking

I got to attend my first Conversion Conference in October of last year and I am pleased to have been invited to speak at this year’s San Francisco conference.

First of all, I learned a LOT at last year’s conference. And I study this stuff all day long.

I don’t pay to attend many conferences, but I think I’m pretty good at picking those that give me information I can use “on Monday.” Conversion Conference is definitely one of those. Just look at some of the agenda items:

Biggest Usability Mistakes That You’re Probably Making

The Science of Shopping Cart Abandonment (I will never look at cart abandonment the same)

Rapid Fire: Lessons Learned from 30,000 Conversion Tests (These kinds of presentations are gold)

Merging SEO & Usability to Drive Conversion (I say “YeSEO”)

Creating Killer Conversion Copy – Email, Landing Pages, PPC Ads and More (This is mine. Never bore your visitors again)

Getting Smart About Conversion on Mobile Devices (We’re all going to have to deal with mobile sooner or later)

 

Landing pages baffle and confuse us. There are a dozens of components that could be used on them: testimonials, trust symbols, long-form copy, video, Johnson boxes, risk reversal, and more.
One of the biggest problems is that we believe that they are Web pages first and foremost. This implies that they have our company logo, our Web site navigation, footer links, and that they are designed like our corporate Web site. This creates the wrong context for our landing pages that make them complex, confusing and ineffective.
If you’re new to the term, a landing page is a page with singular focus. It serves traffic from a single source generally and asks for one action to be completed: complete a form, buy a product, etc.
What if we started with the call to action and grew a page from there? Which components would we add and why?
This is the topic of my DFWSEM presentation The Chemistry of the Landing Page in Dallas. I hope you will come.
We’ll start with this:
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and built our landing page from there. We might find things less baffling.
Register for the event if you’re in or near Dallas on August 10. You won’t leave baffled.

I was on the hot seat at the Austin Content Marketing Meetup.

This isn’t your “play nice and listen while the guy reads his slides” sort of presentation. In the hot seat, the room is actively trying to destroy you, lobbing lit questions from across the room and questioning your every word.

Yes, it even got a little ugly. I think I held up OK.

You’re invited to sit back and enjoy the occasionally heated conversation on how to make your content convert visitors into sales.

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I am your Digital New World Ambassador

What Would You Tell a Printer in this Digital Age

Natives viewing the new world.

To my digital natives and online tribesman everywhere:

What would you tell the printing industry if you had one hour with them?

Think about it: The Printing Industry has been communicating with the world for centuries. While you could argue that they seem slow in adopting digital channels, I would argue that we’ve completely blocked print from our consciousness.

There is an ocean between our peoples.

I have an hour with the Printing Industries of America when I keynote their Converge Conference 2010. Attendees are the boldest of their members, the ones who are looking closely at cross-media business strategies.

  • What would you tell the owner of a printing company?
  • How do you admire them?
  • What do you see that they could be doing better?

Ultimately, I want to understand where the missed opportunities are. When we cross that ocean, what magical happens?

Colonizing the Digital New World

Here’s the setup I’m using for our printing-side brethren:

Welcome to the Digital New World! I am an ambassador for the people of this land. You have traveled far, across the mighty Sea of Apathy to arrive in this place. You have proven yourself as brave explorers. I am here to welcome you and show you around.

We have studied your strange ways and have seen the devices you have that display content without batteries or plugs. I’m sure we seem strange to you as well. Our customs are very different, but we have the same goals: understanding and prosperity.

During your visit, we will examine the differences between us, but more importantly, we will find new opportunities to work together; to combine your “old world” wisdom with our “new world” technology and to build great businesses.

Brian Massey Boat Signature

Brian Massey