Secrets of The “Bad Boys” of Online Sales Conversion

These guys test the hell out of landing pages

We call them affiliate marketers, infopreneurs or online goo-roos. They push health care products, supplements, exercise tapes, and get-rich-quick schemes. At their best they are sophisticated landing page optimizers and savvy search engine technicians. At their worst they are spammers, forum trolls and comment leeches. These are the “bad boys” of online sales conversion (and they’re not all boys).

While many of us wouldn’t want to associate the hard-hitting big-promise experience with our brands, there is much to learn from these pages, and I tackled the task of cataloging some of the best techniques in my short presentation for the Uber Advanced PPC Panel at PubCon South 2010 in Dallas.

Don’t be fooled by the panel name. Christine Churchill, David Szetela and Wister Walcott dove deep into PPC topics. My angle was that improving conversion rates means more to spend on PPC.

Listen for yourself.

Enjoy the full audio and video right here, complete with Prezi.com animation.

Either way, I promise you will immediately find some new things to test on your pages.

Subscribe to The Conversion Scientist Podcast

Bad Boys Motorcycle Image ©Donna Golden

  • Great presentation, Brian. Some of the best stuff is right at the end (re-targeting). I’m going to read your article on ClickZ.

    A couple things I thought of while I watched:

    1. Most of the “bad boys” measure results (conversion rates, acquisition cost, etc), but very few actually go to the trouble of split-testing. I know this firsthand. One guy I know will write and rewrite his sales letters, but never split-test. Hasn’t stopped him from making a few million in a couple years though.

    2. I decided to split-test the Belcher Button. In one case, it beat a different order button used by another Internet marketer. But when I tested the Belcher Button against a plain blue underlined link, the link won. So it’s a good button, but definitely test it. It only took me two tries to beat it.

    Ryan

  • Great presentation, Brian. Some of the best stuff is right at the end (re-targeting). I’m going to read your article on ClickZ.

    A couple things I thought of while I watched:

    1. Most of the “bad boys” measure results (conversion rates, acquisition cost, etc), but very few actually go to the trouble of split-testing. I know this firsthand. One guy I know will write and rewrite his sales letters, but never split-test. Hasn’t stopped him from making a few million in a couple years though.

    2. I decided to split-test the Belcher Button. In one case, it beat a different order button used by another Internet marketer. But when I tested the Belcher Button against a plain blue underlined link, the link won. So it’s a good button, but definitely test it. It only took me two tries to beat it.

    Ryan

  • A great information filled program. (Had to listen twice to get all the points.) But, I expect no less from a fellow Aggie. Thank you for sharing.

  • A great information filled program. (Had to listen twice to get all the points.) But, I expect no less from a fellow Aggie. Thank you for sharing.

  • Great breakdown of the anatomy of a sale letter landing page Brian. I really appreciated the insight into *why* each of the elements is used.

    The pop-over point is one that still sits funny with me. I believe in their effectiveness – but I’m torn about the brand impact of stooping to that level.

    I guess at the end of the day it depends on how long your customers are going to be in your brandsphere. If it’s a one time purchase or lead-gen experience then I suppose you have very little to lose. But seeing respected brands trying it is surprising. Feels like a step back a few years to the popup days. I wonder how long until these are seen as too harmful.

    Thanks again.

  • Great breakdown of the anatomy of a sale letter landing page Brian. I really appreciated the insight into *why* each of the elements is used.

    The pop-over point is one that still sits funny with me. I believe in their effectiveness – but I’m torn about the brand impact of stooping to that level.

    I guess at the end of the day it depends on how long your customers are going to be in your brandsphere. If it’s a one time purchase or lead-gen experience then I suppose you have very little to lose. But seeing respected brands trying it is surprising. Feels like a step back a few years to the popup days. I wonder how long until these are seen as too harmful.

    Thanks again.

  • I just wanted to add a quick note to say I loved this. And, I’m happy that I’m not the only one who’s been studying these sales and squeeze pages even though they make my eyes bleed!

  • Karen

    Fantastic information here. This is exactly what I was looking for. The challenge is balancing what works with what’s on brand. Thanks Brian!

    • Karen,

      Much thanks. Glad you found it helpful.

      Brian

  • Krista Goon

    Thanks. Enjoyed your presentation. Short, useful and engaging. Will be following you on Twitter. Great stuff!

  • Pingback: Best Practices for Selling Information Products | Lander Blog()